Welcome to “Truth about Fur”…the Blog!

truth about fur
Armand Herscovici in his Montreal fur atelier (1955)

As someone raised in the fur trade (my grandfather arrived in Canada one hundred years ago, in 1913, as a young artisan furrier), I have long felt that something important was missing from most discussions about fur. What has been missing is the voice of the knowledgeable and passionate people who work in this remarkable heritage industry.

Truth about Fur is intended to fix that. The new web-portal provides easy access to information about the North American trade that has often been difficult to research. And everything is presented by people who are personally involved: wildlife biologists and veterinarians, trappers and fur farmers, processors, designers and craftspeople.

This blog is a place for wider-ranging discussions about the ecological, social and even philosophical implications of fur in our society.  Again, you will hear the voices of the real people of the fur trade.

Fur has long been recognized as a prestigious, natural material – some would say the ultimate luxury – but the trade itself has been a black box.  The people behind the glamorous coats have been invisible.  Often talked about, but rarely heard.  That’s too bad because, as you will see in this blog, they have some fascinating stories to tell.

In my first posts, I will explore the reasons why there is a controversy about fur – and why it matters.  The real reasons may surprise you!

Alan Herscovici
Senior Researcher, Truth about Fur

10 Comments

  • Keep it up Alan. It’s been decades since we first met. my wife and I are elders now and still trapping . Some years we spend more on producing furs than we make selling them but overall we get by. The fur industry needs articulate advocates like you .thank you for promoting fur that enables our lifestyle to continue.

    • Thank you Richard, great hearing from you. Send us some pictures to post in our Fur Family Photo Album!

  • Thank you for your enlightening TRUTH ABOUT FUR website, I have found it very refreshing to have learned more about fur and how far animal activists will go to bend the truth. I now feel comfortable about discussing the logical side of this issue. I never could believe that a trapper or a rancher would skin an animal alive because that would be a case where laws are broken and the pelt would be ruined. Aside from the fact that at auction the value would be close to zero$. Just how dumb and gullible are these avctivists. I can go on but you guys already know, so once again thanks for the info and kudos to you .

  • Great! A blog that justifies the killing of animals for someone elses vanity. No one needs a mink coat ore than a mink. You should be ashamed.

    • There are many social, economic and environmental reasons why it is ethical to use fur. Every serious environmental conservation authority now supports the responsible and sustainable use of animals and other renewable, natural resources. And the fur trade supports the livelihoods and cultures of farmers and trappers living in regions where alternate employment is not easily found. The real “vanity” here is the arrogance of urban activists who would impose their beliefs on everyone else.

  • Sono inamorata con la lavorazione della pelliccia da quanto ero piccola, guardavo il mio padre come lavorava le code di visone al’inizio e poi icapi con peli interi di visone. Ero sicura per me, avrei fatto sicuramente questo lavoro, cosi sono stata in Italia a studiare stilismo e modelismo e da 30 anni tutti i giorni mi trovo tra pelliccie nella mia cara citta di Kastoria.

  • Sounds (refreshingly) different yet bang-on trend. First the hipsters bring back true delicatessens, now the fur industry’s ‘coureurs de bois’ have a blog.

    Curious to hear more..

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